Energy in the home

Electricity useage

Average 2000 sq ft Canadian home

Average monthly electrical bill $142 ( based on household average monthly usage of 1000Kw) ( Not including electrically heated homes)

Average Annual Heating Cost , natural gas $1100/yr Oil $3700/yr Propane$4200 Electric Furnace or Baseboard $3300.

http://www.hydroone.com/MyBusiness/SaveEnergy/Pages/SBLighting.aspx

You can monitor your electricity usage with a plug load monitor. Inexpensive plug in monitor to find out individual device electrical use

Buy energy efficient appliances- Energy Star

For lighting use compact fluorescent- LED (they cost more but lasts a long time)  

How about a solar clothes dryer? – use a clothesline and do laundry in cold water.

Ceiling fans to circulate air.

Time of use: depending on time of year, electricity costs are lower at certain times of the day. These times change twice a year.

http://www.ontarioenergyboard.ca/OEB/Consumers/Electricity/Electricity+Prices

OPA Save on Energy program coupons

Type of Heating System

Electric Furnace or Baseboards Most expensive – All furnaces keep filters clean

Oil, Almost as expensive as electric heating

Propane - Getting more costly. Insurance regulations are often making rural properties switch from oil. Works well with Air Source Heat Pumps (ASHP)

Air Source Heat Pumps- extract latent ‘heat’ from large volume of air - newer most efficient units almost as efficient as Ground Source Heat Pump at fraction of the cost- Save 25 to 50% energy cost over electricity, oil, propane

http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy/publications/efficiency/heating-heat-pump/6831

Ground Source Heat Pumps - extracts latent heat from ground. Need large area to dig 100-300ft trenches. It is expensive to install, but very efficient. Ground source heat pumps are not very good for very large homes or home with high heating requirements.

Water Source Heat Pump- same as a Ground Source Heat Pump but even more efficient- Need body of water ideally at least 8ft deep. Large pond or lake, river or large creek-

http://www.geokiss.com/consumer-info/HowG&WSourceHeatPumpsWork.pdf

Cost Saving Comparisons-

https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy/publications/efficiency/heating-heat-pump/6835

Wood  Heat

Ideal stove is a Kochel or masonry oven and it creates more heat from less wood. A traditional woodstove is 30-50% efficient. Newer cleaner burning stoves have a secondary burner and will burn 85% clean burn with less soot

http://www.alternative-heating.com/

For those really adventurous check out Rocket Mass Heaters- Super efficient-  http://www.rocketmassheater.ca/

Cords used- Depends on Size of home, Insulation levels, home configuration, temperature of home,  efficiency of system- average-5-10 bush cord

Species used- Hardwoods best- HOME- Hickory, Oak, Maple, Elm or longer list from harder to softer- Ironwood, Rock Elm, Hickory, Oak Sugar Maple,Beech, Yellow Birch, Ash, Red Elm, Red Maple Tamarack, Douglas fir, White Birch, Manitoba Maple Red Alder, Hemlock, Poplar, Pine, Basswood, Spruce, Balsam.

In the shoulder seasons, spring and fall, when not a lot of heat required the softer woods are fine

http://www.woodheat.org/good-firewood.html

Wood Varies widely depending on if you get your own wood- Free except for labour and equipment. Purchase usually $200 to $300/bush cord.

Tandem load of logs is generally the lowest cost if you need to purchase.

Seasoning of wood dry for at least one year. Some wood takes longer to dry than others i.e.oak. Other woods like ash very short time.

Fuel wood, the environment and  the 21st Century

Cooking with wood

Electricity Usage

You can monitor your electricity usage with a plug load monitor. Inexpensive plug in monitor to find out individual device electrical use

Buy energy efficient appliances- Energy Star

For lighting use compact fluorescent- LED (they cost more but lasts a long time)  

How about a solar clothes dryer? – use a clothesline and do laundry in cold water.

Ceiling fans to circulate air.

Time of use: depending on time of year, electricity costs are lower at certain times of the day. These times change twice a year.

http://www.ontarioenergyboard.ca/OEB/Consumers/Electricity/Electricity+Prices

OPA Save on Energy program coupons

Keeping The Heat In-http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy/efficiency/housing/home-improvements/15768

NRCan, CMHC, Keeping the Heat In ,CMHC- Residential Wood Heating

Resnet-Interactive Smart House