It was a Tuesday in early February 2015 when Sylvie Gravel walked into her colleague Paul Makar’s office carrying printouts that would mystify both of them.
The two scientists at Environment and Climate Change Canada were staring at computer model forecasts of ozone gas. Up in the Earth’s atmosphere, the ozone layer helps block harmful ultraviolet radiation. But closer to the surface, the reactive gas has been linked to health problems and smog, so the federal government department monitors it in air quality forecasts.
 

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

More to explore

Sowing connections. Growing community.

ATTENTION 2022 MEMBERS! Watch for an important members-only email coming soon! If you haven’t paid your membership, there’s still time!  Register and pay your

Newsletter

Get the latest Harvest Hastings news in your inbox

15585

Stay Connected

Sign Up for the Harvest Hastings Newsletter