If left untreated, say farewell to Ontario’s ash tree

The clock is ticking for Ontario’s ash trees.
The ‘delete’ button was pressed a few years ago and within the next three to five years, all of the untreated ash will be history. The emerald ash borer (EAB) has crept up from the mid-western States, arriving there about 15 years ago from Asia. It begins its nasty work very quickly, gnawing its way under the bark of ash (all Fraxinus species) until they are dead.
In Ottawa, the total number of ash trees represents more than 20 per cent of the tree canopy. Ouch! No matter where you live in the lower portion of Ontario, EAB is one big pain.

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